Michael J. Riley, Sr., Louisiana

Michael J. Riley, attorney in Louisiana.

Current Professional Pursuits

Michael J. Riley, Jr. is an attorney by training.  


J.D., University of Tennessee-Knoxville (1980), Michael J. Riley, Sr. currently serves FEMA as an Emergency Manager,  Federal Emergency Management Agency, Operations Division Supervisor. Primary role is to ensure that efficient, effective communication and coordination between the Federal, State, Local, Tribal and/or Territorial (SLTT) governments at the lowest level of the incident on behalf of the incident management organization. Ensures that all actions are consistent with and support the incident objectives and the working assignments identified in the Incident Action Plan (IAP) for each Operational Period; and clear any proposed deviation to IAP and/or incident objective. Expertise includes Small and Disadvantaged Business Enterprises, contract compliance, procurement, and Civil Rights.


He has served the American people and international community in various different locations affected by natural disasters, including Puerto Rico and Haiti.


Blog: https://michaeljriley.blogspot.com/

Profile: https://solomonlawguild.com/michael-j-riley

News: https://hype.news/michael-j-riley-sr-attorney-in-louisiana/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-riley-97286b4a/

Contact

New Orleans, Louisiana.

Education

Juris Doctor, University of Tennessee, 1980.

Prior Experience

2007-2018 - The Cantrell Law Firm,  supporting civil litigation preparation in the area of personal injury, to include medical malpractice, disaster insurance litigation. Plaintiff litigation support of complaints related to all aspects of Labor Law, including Small and Disadvantaged Business Enterprises, Civil Rights and Affirmative Action. This includes staff training and supervision in office administration.

Economic Development Experience

1986-2007 Michael J. Riley, Sr. Inc. Privately held Economic Development, Consulting and Investments Company. Worked with Small and Disadvantaged Business Enterprises through every stage of development to contract acquisition. This included capital, insurance and bonding requirements. Supervise staff of employees in all areas of management for various private industry clients.

News about Michael J. Riley, Louisiana

Michael J. Riley, Sr. currently serves FEMA as an Emergency Manager.

Call for amendment to section 404 of the Stafford Act

Additional Information

Michael J. Riley, Sr., attorney with over a decade of experience in the field of federal emergency management, comments the call for amendment to section 404 of the Stafford Act.


In a new blog article, Michael J. Riley, Jr. provides information related to a possible amendment of Section 404 of the Stafford Act.


Formally named the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (hereinafter “Stafford Act”), the law, which was passed in 1988, provides the framework for federal disaster and emergency management through the Federal Emergency Management Agency (“FEMA”). The Stafford Act amended the Disaster Relief Act of 1974 and authorizes FEMA to provide financial and logistical assistance upon a presidential disaster declaration.  


The Stafford Act has been amended several times since its passage in 1988 and has its share of critics regarding areas it needs to be improved on. One particular subject that has received recent attention is the call to amend section 404 of the Act.


The Stafford Act authorizes FEMA to oversee the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program under section 404 and section 406 of the Act. Section 406 is the more limited of the two, providing discretionary funding to mitigation measures in conjunction with repairs of disaster damaged facilities. Such funding is limited to disaster declared counties and eligible damaged facilities. Section 404 is the broader program. FEMA provides funding to the states under section 404 and states may use them anywhere in the state, not just disaster declared counties. 


Such funding is used to prevent or reduce damages caused in the future. 

Current FEMA Administrator Brock Long testified about the needed changes in section 404 of the Stafford Act in his Senate testimony on October 31, 2017, before the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. “The problem with the way the system is established is you have to get hit to have an extraordinary amount of post-disaster hurricane grant mitigation funding. I believe that’s not the right way of doing business.” Administrator Long went on to explain “[t]he 404 money, it would be amazing if we could work with the Senate and this committee to move that to the front side. On average, I believe we put out $700 million or $800 million in post-disaster mitigation funding. Why are we not doing that on the front side and get it out of recovery and reduce the complexities of recovery and put it up front?” Democratic Senator John Tester noted during the hearing that every dollar spent on the front end of a disaster would save four dollars on the back end.


Mr. Riley explains. By allowing FEMA to distribute 404 funding for pre-disaster mitigation, the funds could be put to much more efficient and meaningful use. Currently, 404 funding is only available after disaster strikes and presidential declaration issued. Once those conditions are met, then 404 funding is available as part of the recovery process to mitigate damages from future disasters. Some commentators noted that giving FEMA flexibility to anticipate and prepare for disasters beforehand would certainly serve the long-term interests of the nation and promote more efficient allocation of resources.


Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in this publication are those of the author. They do not purport to reflect the opinions or views of FEMA or any government agency. 


About Michael Jerome Riley, Sr.


Trained as a lawyer, J.D., University of Tennessee-Knoxville (1980), Michael J. Riley, Sr. currently serves FEMA as an Emergency Manager, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Operations Division Supervisor. Primary role is to ensure that efficient, effective communication and coordination between the Federal, State, Local, Tribal and/or Territorial (SLTT) governments at the lowest level of the incident on behalf of the incident management organization. Ensures that all actions are consistent with and support the incident objectives and the working assignments identified in the Incident Action Plan (IAP) for each Operational Period; and clear any proposed deviation to IAP and/or incident objective. Expertise includes Small and Disadvantaged Business Enterprises, contract compliance, procurement and development issues, and Civil Rights.


Blog: https://michaeljriley.blogspot.com/

Profile: https://solomonlawguild.com/michael-j-riley

News: https://hype.news/michael-j-riley-sr-attorney-in-louisiana/


Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in this publication are those of the author. They do not purport to reflect the opinions or views of FEMA or any government agency.

Learn More

More information is available on the blog of Michael J. Riley, Sr.

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Michael J. Riley, Sr. about Law & Technology

Attorney Michael J. Riley publishes articles about technology & law practice

Attorney Michael J. Riley publishes first article in a series about technology & the legal profession in the area of Emergency Management


Emergency management covers a broad range of issues that can be better managed with software and other technologies.


Emergency Management in the U.S. is surprisingly broad. A lawyer in this area will encounter issues as diverse as Grant Management and Administration, Public Assistance Program, Environmental and Historic Preservation Requirements, Hazardous Materials, and Project Funding. Incorporating technology into a law practice in this area can make the practice more efficient and increase client satisfaction. In fact, technology may enable the practitioner to exceed client expectations.


In this first article in a series, Michael J. Riley, Sr. focuses on Case Management by software. The complete articles will be published on the blog of Michael Riley at https://michaeljriley.blogspot.com/


Technology is advancing, and the legal profession must keep up with these technological and societal changes. 


Many of us still remember when they first saw a personal computer, when cell phones became widely available, and when cell phones turned into smart phones that have become indispensable for many.


Incorporating technology into a law practice can make the practice more efficient and increase client satisfaction. In fact, technology may enable the practitioner to exceed client expectations. Here are a few, simple-to-implement options.


Case Management Software


Long gone are the days of paper routing slips, desktop inboxes and consecutive reviews by paralegals and attorneys during which papers and files are shuffled back and forth. With case management software, incoming documents are reviewed in a pre-determined sequence or as authorized, and files or documents are updated the same way. The staff has real-time access to documents and status reports. Important dates are automatically entered into a calendar. Case Management Software also enables legal teams to focus on a pre-set process, thus saving time and energy, and greatly reducing the stress in this deadline-driven profession. Case Management Software can also greatly reduce costs for the law practice and the clients by standardizing and accelerating document creation and maintenance.


There are many different kinds of Case Management Software, some general ones such as:


https://www.capterra.com 

https://www.clio.com

https://www.mycase.com

https://www.trialworks.com

https://www.cosmolex.com


In fact, there is at least one software that is tailored for emergency management, https://www.emergency-response-planning.com/incident-crisis-emergency-management-software


SMARTPLAN™ Software is response planning and emergency management software. It can be used for different locations and is web-based. Included are preparedness programs based on “best practices”, company protocols, and regulatory requirements.


These are just a few examples, and should not be considered endorsements of any of these products. Each law practice should make sure to test them carefully before buying, and take advantage of the free test versions or consultations that many software providers offer as part of their sales process. Find the right software to fit your own needs and your client’s expectations

Research and Mobile Technology

Subscription research services such as LEXIS and Westlaw have been available to attorneys online for decades, gradually rendering hard copy law libraries obsolete. The internet has done for law what it has for every other area of modern life, providing instant access to information.

To be continued. - The complete article will be published on the blog of Michael J. Riley at https://michaeljriley.blogspot.com/

*NOTE: The inclusion of a technology or app in this article does not mean an endorsement or approval. The listed technologies are just for illustrative purposes. None of these particular technologies are endorsed or recommended by this author.


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Emergency Responder Michael Riley publishes second article in a series about technology & law practice in the area of Emergency Management 

Experienced emergency responder and lawyer reviews the advancements of technology as to emergency management law practice, and how it is utilized to enhance the client experience.

Incorporating technology into a law practice can make the practice more efficient and increase client satisfaction. In fact, technology may enable the practitioner to exceed client expectations

— Michael J. Riley, Sr., Attorney in New Orleans

In this second published article in a series, New Orleans-based business attorney Michael J. Riley, Sr. discusses the advancements and impact of technology upon the legal profession, and how it is being utilized to enhance the client experience in terms of satisfaction and customer service. As technology reshapes all of modern personal and professional life, the legal profession is no exception. 

Emergency management covers a broad range of issues that can be better managed with software and other technologies.

Emergency Management in the U.S. is surprisingly broad. A lawyer in this area will encounter issues as diverse as Grant Management and Administration, Public Assistance Program, Environmental and Historic Preservation Requirements, Hazardous Materials, and Project Funding. Incorporating technology into a law practice in this area can make the practice more efficient and increase client satisfaction. In fact, technology may enable the practitioner to exceed client expectations.

This article focuses on research and document management. The complete article will be published on the blog of Michael J. Riley, Sr. at https://michaeljriley.blogspot.com/

As technology is advancing, the legal profession is not exempt. Incorporating technology into a law practice can make the practice more efficient and increase client satisfaction. In fact, technology may enable the practitioner to exceed client expectations. Here are a few, simple-to-implement options.

Research Efficiency

The internet has placed all of society’s information at one’s fingertips, and again the legal profession is not exempt. The speed of research has dramatically increased. An attorney can analyze a legal matter much more quickly without even leaving the desk. However, that is what clients expect nowadays - instant results.

There are a few tools that can make your job easier. For example, many cases and articles are available for free on Google Scholar (https://scholar.google.com/) or on Findlaw (https://www.Findlaw.com). Most courts post their forms and cases on the Web, reducing search time to minutes and saving you a walk to the courthouse.

Coming back to smart phones, many attorneys today use them even for legal work. A 2016 survey conducted by the American Bar Association found that 88 percent of respondents used smart phones for law-related work. A fifth of them were using research apps, and those numbers have undoubtedly surged since. 

e-Subscriptions

To make your law practice more efficient, subscribing to multiple industry-related blogs and news outlets may deliver relevant information right to your email inbox. In turn, you may be able to tailor valuable information to specific clients and send them a proactive communication.

The Cloud/On-Line Repositories

There are many ways to incorporate a secure document repository in your practice. Online document management providers offer some limited client document sharing and also offer full-scale extranets as an add-on. There are many options and price points for achieving the logical benefit of client document repositories.

Web-based software enables a firm’s documents to be securely stored in “the cloud” and provide accessibility from nearly any location. The safety of such storage systems has increased greatly, and allows you to have remote access while on the road or working from home.

For example, you can set up a system whereby the lawyer uploads the documents he/she wants to share with the client and the client accesses them via a secure log-in. 

Michael J. Riley, Sr. concludes that the benefit to the client includes having all the documents for a matter in a single repository, accessible at his convenience, with the lawyer taking responsibility for document management. One can update or replace the documents as needed, thus eliminating concerns over versions. Popular examples include www.litigationservices.com and www.alphareporting.com 

To be continued. - The complete article will be published on the blog of Michael J. Riley, Sr. at https://michaeljriley.blogspot.com/

*NOTE: The inclusion of a technology or app in this article does not mean an endorsement or approval. The listed technologies are just for illustrative purposes. None of these particular technologies are endorsed or recommended by this author.

Disclosure & Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in this publication are those of the author. They do not purport to reflect the opinions or views of FEMA or any government agency.

About Michael Jerome Riley, Sr.

Trained as a lawyer, J.D., University of Tennessee-Knoxville (1980), Michael J. Riley, Sr. currently serves FEMA as an Emergency Manager, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Operations Division Supervisor. Expertise includes Small and Disadvantaged Business Enterprises, contract compliance, procurement, and Civil Rights. He has served the American people and international community in various different locations affected by natural disasters, including Puerto Rico and Haiti.

Blog: https://michaeljriley.blogspot.com/

Profile: https://solomonlawguild.com/michael-j-riley

News: https://hype.news/michael-j-riley-sr-attorney-in-louisiana/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-riley-97286b4a/


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Emergency Responder & Lawyer Michael J. Riley, Sr. publishes third article in a series about technology & law practice in the area of Emergency Management 

As technology reshapes all of modern personal and professional life, the legal profession is no exception.

In fact, proactive communications with clients may be an effective marketing tool, such as an alert to a client about regulatory actions that are about to affect their business.”

— Michael J. Riley, Sr., Attorney in Louisiana

Emergency management covers a broad range of issues that can be better managed with software and other technologies.

Emergency Management in the U.S. is surprisingly broad. A lawyer in this area will encounter issues as diverse as Grant Management and Administration, Public Assistance Program, Environmental and Historic Preservation Requirements, Hazardous Materials, and Project Funding. Incorporating technology into a law practice in this area can make the practice more efficient and increase client satisfaction. In fact, technology may enable the practitioner to exceed client expectations.

In this third article in a series, Emergency Responder and attorney Michael J. Riley, Sr. discusses the advancements and impact of technology upon the legal profession, and how it is being utilized to enhance the client experience in terms of satisfaction and customer service. As technology reshapes all of modern personal and professional life, the legal profession is no exception. 

The complete article will be published on the blog of Michael J. Riley, Sr. at https://michaeljriley.blogspot.com/

Technology is advancing, and the legal profession must keep up with these technological and societal changes. Many of us still remember when they first saw a personal computer, when cell phones became widely available, and when cell phones turned into smart phones that have become indispensable for many.

Incorporating technology into a law practice can make the practice more efficient and increase client satisfaction. In fact, technology may enable the practitioner to exceed client expectations. Here are a few, simple-to-implement options.

Phone Systems

Phone systems have advanced greatly. A wealth of call forwarding technologies enable clients to call a central number to reach an attorney anywhere. Skype enables you to conduct video conference calls during which you can share a screen and exchange documents.

But with phone forwarding, you may even have a remote answering such as Ruby Receptionists (www.callruby.com), which then takes a message or forwards the call to a specified phone number. Other services with great flexibility include Ring Central (www.ringentral.com), Ooma (www.ooma.com) and Jive (www.jive.com).

Suddenly a physical office or geographical distance are less important. It has become almost normal for clients to work with law firms at a greater distance from their home or business location. Having an office close to your clients (or close to the courthouse) is suddenly not as critical.

Michael J. Riley, Sr. notes that this also benefits clients, as they may decide to hire an attorney whose office is not nearby. It affords clients access to much greater legal talent and improved access to quality representation than was once available to them in smaller towns/markets. 

What used to be an in-person consultation can now be done by email or a video conference. Since the number of in-person meetings is reduced, the cost to clients is reduced as well.

Virtual Meetings

Getting together for face-to-face meetings with clients can sometimes be difficult, especially when it includes travel. Skype (www.skype.com) and EZ Talks (www.eztalks.com), www.GoToMeeting.com and other video systems allow you to offer the experience of a live meeting, which can be much more productive and stimulating than a simple phone call, since human beings communicate to large extent non-verbally, through gestures, facial expressions, etc. Numerous Web-conferencing tools provide such visual and human elements of a live meeting. They allow attendees to communicate, collaborate on documents and even give presentations in real time.

In fact, there are free (or almost free) services with a lot of functionality that are useful for sharing and discussing on-screen documents, giving a presentation, recording and chat capabilities.

Client Portals

Online Client Portals are an option especially for a high-volume practice such as bankruptcy or immigration law. Instead of answering innumerable phone calls with questions such as “What is the status of my case?”, the firm offers access to a Portal where clients can see their exact case status in real time. In fact, password-protected portions of a law firm’s website may be a more secure alternative to email. Clients can access their case information day or night, comment on drafts and get updates on court dates. Examples include Practice Panther (www.practicepanther.com) and One Hub (www.onehub.com).

Still somewhat expensive due to the cost and complexity of implementation, client portals will undoubtedly proliferate further as the technology matures.

Social Media 

Whether you like it or not, Social Media has become inescapable. Review websites like Yelp! or Avvo list Attorneys regardless and allow anybody to post reviews and comments about one’s practice. Further, Facebook creates “inofficial” Facebook pages for professionals, which in effect may force them to set up actual Facebook pages and join their platform. In many cases, the best option for the legal practitioner may be to embrace Social Media and claim the profile to use and control it to their advantage.

Google Maps - Locations

In past, even small problems like “I cannot find your office” could interrupt a client relationship. No more. Today you can put “Directions” on your website to ensure that all clients can find your office easily when they have to. Google Maps can be customized for clients, and also shows the way to related locations to one’s Practice (i.e. Courthouse, Government Offices, etc.). Google Streetview also can show clients what your office building looks like from the outside.

Case Reminders

Everybody is busy. We all receive too many emails. Thus, many messages get lost in the shuffle. Providing communications or updates via email, text message, or voicemail can remind clients of upcoming appointments, deadlines, court dates, etc.

Sharing Information with Clients

Here at our law firm, at the commencement of services, we fully discuss communication preferences with clients. This includes discussing methods for exchanging confidential information and their preferences for receiving other, general communications.

In fact, proactive communications with clients may be an effective marketing tool, such as an alert to a client about regulatory actions that are about to affect their business.

To be continued.

The complete article will be published on the blog of Michael J. Riley, Sr. at https://michaeljriley.blogspot.com/

Disclosure & Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in this publication are those of the author. They do not purport to reflect the opinions or views of FEMA or any government agency.

About Michael Jerome Riley, Sr.

Trained as a lawyer, J.D., University of Tennessee-Knoxville (1980), Michael J. Riley, Sr. currently serves FEMA as an Emergency Manager, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Operations Division Supervisor. Expertise includes Small and Disadvantaged Business Enterprises, contract compliance, procurement, and Civil Rights. He has served the American people and international community in various different locations affected by natural disasters, including Puerto Rico and Haiti.

Blog: https://michaeljriley.blogspot.com/

Profile: https://solomonlawguild.com/michael-j-riley

News: https://hype.news/michael-j-riley-sr-attorney-in-louisiana/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-riley-97286b4a/


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Final article in a series about technology & law practice in the area of Emergency Management published by Michael J. Riley, Sr.

As technology is advancing, the legal profession must keep up with these technological and societal changes, explains Michael J. Riley, Sr. in an article series.

Long gone are the days of paper routing slips, desktop inboxes and consecutive reviews by paralegals and attorneys during which papers and files are shuffled back and forth.

— Michael J. Riley, Sr., Attorney in New Orleans

In this final article in a series, emergency responder and attorney Michael J. Riley, Sr. discusses the advancements and impact of technology upon the legal profession, and how it is being utilized to enhance the client experience in terms of satisfaction and customer service. As technology reshapes all of modern personal and professional life, the legal profession is no exception. 

Emergency management covers a broad range of issues that can be better managed with software and other technologies.

Emergency Management in the U.S. is surprisingly broad. A lawyer in this area will encounter issues as diverse as Grant Management and Administration, Public Assistance Program, Environmental and Historic Preservation Requirements, Hazardous Materials, and Project Funding. Incorporating technology into a law practice in this area can make the practice more efficient and increase client satisfaction. In fact, technology may enable the practitioner to exceed client expectations.

The complete articles will be published on the blog of Michael Riley at https://michaeljriley.blogspot.com/

Incorporating technology into a law practice can make the practice more efficient and increase client satisfaction. In fact, technology may enable the practitioner to exceed client expectations. Here are a few, simple-to-implement options.

Payment Services-Electronic Invoices

Payment by check is gradually becoming a thing of the past. Credit Card Payments are now commonplace, and even other forms of payment such as ACH, wire transfers, and Paypal are becoming more commonplace. While there are costs associated with taking credit card payments or Paypal, the ease of use and the increased speed of getting paid are often worth the fees. Many merchant account vendors now provide a Web portal to facilitate online payments. Google and Square (www.square.com) as well as Legal Software Systems (www.legalsoftwaresystems.com) provide technology to accept payments via smartphone. 

There are ethics opinions regarding Attorneys accepting credit cards for payments, thus one should consult the local ethics rules.

Confidentiality Protections

Maintaining the confidentiality of client information is an ethical foundation of the profession. Encryption tools may add extra security to electronic communications. Document efforts to keep their clients’ information safe and secure.

Signing Documents Electronically

Services like DocuSign (www.docusign.com), RightSignature (www.rightsignature.com) and e-Sign Live (www.esignlive.com) can save time and effort in cases where no wet signature is required and an electronic signature is sufficient.

On-line Calendaring and Scheduling

Scheduling meetings can be an enormous drag upon staff time and efficiency. This may cause delays and confusion, especially when the client or lawyer must re-schedule a previously scheduled meeting.

There are several options for simplifying scheduling. One of them is TimeTap (www.timetap.com). For example, potential clients can instantly schedule an appointment online. It also removes impediments from new clients to make contact with one’s Firm.

Online scheduling and appointment booking products such as TimeTap synchronize with your Outlook or Google calendar and display your free and busy times to your clients and prospects. 

Then, by simply clicking on a button from your Web site or using a secure portal, they can select one of your free times and can directly set up an appointment. Time Tap offers the ability to send out automated appointment reminders, and lets one reschedule and automatically send the rescheduling information. This added efficiency and flexibility means fewer demands on their overcrowded schedules. These services will contribute to improved quality, convenience and affordability.

Example of Technology Suite for a Small Law Firm

In case you wonder what technologies other law firms have, here is an actual real life example. This small law firm uses the following technologies:

• CosmoLex (online and App) – Law Practice Management Software

• LawPay (online and App) – Payment software for billing/invoicing.

• Google Suite (online and App) – Document creation/management.

• Dropbox (online and App) – Transfer/management of large files.

• Westlaw – Legal Research.

• Skype – Phones & video conferencing.

• Facetime – Client communications.

And since many law firms are gradually going “paperless,” a system for scanning documents and managing electronic files becomes indispensable.

Conclusion

Harnessing technology can greatly increase client satisfaction, save time and effort, and reduce the stress of practicing law in this fast-moving world. Undoubtedly, technology will continue to change the ways that legal teams serve their clients. My personal advice is to take it step-by-step: evaluate where is the greatest need in your office. Cooperating on documents? Scheduling appointments with clients? Making payments easier for clients? Then develop a strategy for best addressing those needs by implementing one of the numerous technological options and integrating it into the workflow of the office.

*NOTE: The inclusion of a technology or app in this article does not mean an endorsement or approval. The listed technologies are just for illustrative purposes. None of these particular technologies are endorsed or recommended by this author.

The complete article will be published on the blog of Michael J. Riley, Sr. at https://michaeljriley.blogspot.com/

Disclosure & Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in this publication are those of the author. They do not purport to reflect the opinions or views of FEMA or any government agency.

About Michael Jerome Riley, Sr.

Trained as a lawyer, J.D., University of Tennessee-Knoxville (1980), Michael J. Riley, Sr. currently serves FEMA as an Emergency Manager, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Operations Division Supervisor. Expertise includes Small and Disadvantaged Business Enterprises, contract compliance, procurement, and Civil Rights. He has served the American people and international community in various different locations affected by natural disasters, including Puerto Rico and Haiti.

Blog: https://michaeljriley.blogspot.com/

Profile: https://solomonlawguild.com/michael-j-riley

News: https://hype.news/michael-j-riley-sr-attorney-in-louisiana/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-riley-97286b4a/

Michael Jerome Riley, Sr. - Trained as a lawyer, J.D., University of Tennessee-Knoxville (1980).

Michael Jerome Riley, Sr. - Trained as a lawyer, J.D., University of Tennessee-Knoxville (1980).